Sharing is Caring

No-Code Feb 04, 2020

Hey! We have social media now! Well, kind of. We have Twitter. Twitter is cool, right? It’s not an endless pit of people telling you you’re wrong and spreading hate all around, is it? Anyway, now we have one, so feel free to follow and check us out here! You will be updated on every development from us, you’ll get to know more companies and people in the No-Code community, and be able to read past entries from our blog.

But our arrival to Twitter made me think about the importance of communication, of a supporting community and an engaged audience. After all, what good does the No-Code movement serves if it can’t be shared massively? This, of course, applies to everything in life. Knowledge without communication serves practically no purpose apart from an egotistical self satisfaction. And don’t get me wrong, sometimes we need stuff that is just for us, but almost always is better to share!

Why? Well, in first place, it might change your perspective. It certainly did for us. A couple weeks ago we started sharing some of our work and processes with colleagues, and we were pretty confident about what we are doing, and still are! But sharing allowed us to see what we’ve been doing for months from a different set of eyes, with a different background, different interests, and different knowledges.

It set a spark of creativity we didn’t know we needed! And that happens a lot when you don’t leave your work just to yourself. At certain points your mind reaches a limit when it’s in its own. It stalls. By sharing ideas with others and communicating, a lot of doors open in your mind, AND the minds of others. Sometimes just the act of communicating something, reveals another thing that was unknown until that point.

And sometimes it might be a useful diagnosis tool. It’s not uncommon to be working close in something, to the point that you end up ignoring stuff that shouldn’t be overlooked. It happens. And that’s when communicating your stuff with others becomes valuable. It can be something small, like ‘Oh, I think this logo shouldn’t be in gray’; to something so big that you think it is impossible to mess up, like ‘This is very cool! but, what does it do? It’s not explained.’ This might save you a lot of stress, time, and even money.

Join us on Twitter!

The other obvious perk is the visibility and reach you get when you share your work in platforms like Twitter or LinkedIn, or a Slack Channel. People start getting interested in what you are doing and start keeping an eye on you. That is good for two reasons.

First, you now have a standard to maintain, a reputation to live up to. I don’t say this to stress you over what people think of you or your work. I’m saying, use this in your favor as a healthy dose of pressure. If no one is expecting anything from you, you might not feel the need to do anything. But the moment someone praises your work and starts getting excited about it and can’t wait to see what’s next, then you have a responsibility with them to do your best, for yourself of course, but also for them, who believed in you in the first place.

And that’s the other thing. Yes, it might be stressful to have pressure from others, but it’s also a boost in morale, don’t you think? It means people are liking what you are doing. That your idea actually solves a problem someone is having. And that’s the best feeling! To see in others what you were imagining of your product, your service, your endeavor, your whatever. It’s a great reason to keep going and keep improving, if I may say so.

So please, don’t disregard sharing your stuff. You might think no one will care, but almost always, at least one person will, and that might just make the difference.

HelloGuru.

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